Blankinship House // c.1840

Across from the Marion Town Hall (last post), this perfect little cottage showcases what makes coastal New England so special. Built around 1840, by and for Warren Blankinship, a carpenter in town, the home represents a well-preserved example of a modest Greek Revival home. The home is clad in cedar shingles, a hallmark of many coastal homes in New England. White Cedar shingles are so popular historically as the species is such a hard wood that pieces are naturally insect and rot resistant and hold up amazingly well to salt air. Early colonists noted the use of the tree for canoes and other objects by Native people and followed suit, constructing homes from the native tree. The shingles were usually left exposed, and they would eventually weather over time. The exposed, cedar shingles have been a classic look in coastal homes since and even today, evoke a strong sense of place when seen on an old home here.

2 thoughts on “Blankinship House // c.1840

  1. Lower Mills Dorchester August 13, 2021 / 9:23 am

    Would love to see something about the Thomas Crane Public Library

    On Wed, Aug 11, 2021 at 5:28 PM Buildings of New England wrote:

    > Buildings of New England posted: ” Across from the Marion Town Hall (last > post), this perfect little cottage showcases what makes coastal New England > so special. Built around 1840, by and for Warren Blankinship, a carpenter > in town, the home represents a well-preserved example of a mo” >

    Like

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