Collinsville Stores // c.1880

These two Italianate-style stores sit on Collinsville’s Main Street, a walkable main street village along the banks of the Farmington River. Each structure has a central, recessed entry with storefront windows meeting the sidewalk. One structure is two stories with a very shallow gable roof and the other is 1 1/2 stories with a false front. These false front facades remind me of old frontier towns in western movies, they are great!

Elias Danforth House // 1832

On the southern end of Center Village in Lancaster, MA, this gorgeous late-Federal style home holds a stately presence built into and atop a sloping hill. The home was built for Elias Danforth (1788-1868) in 1832 and has been so little-altered in the nearly 200 years since. The house features amazing full-length side porches with bold columns, an early sign of the emerging Greek Revival style. The home sold a couple years ago for just over $600,000, which is a STEAL for the location and high-quality house and interior. Wow!

Brookfield Village Store // 1867

Significant as the last extant commercial building in the quaint Brookfield Village, this 1867 structure gives us a glimpse into village life in the latter half of the 19th century. The structure was constructed by Henry Smith Peck (1834-1884), who also constructed a home for his new family next door. Within a year of the store opening, Peck was joined by a partner and they opened Peck & Somers, a general store for the village, which sold local wares as well as imported goods. As is the history of many towns, in the 1960s, 100 years after the store was built, a developer purchased the building in order to demolish it for a “modern store”. The townspeople spoke out against the proposal, saving this charming building! The building is now occupied by a local real estate company.

Wauregan Mills Company Store // 1875

Located a block away from the Wauregan Mill, and surrounded by worker’s housing built by the Wauregan Mill Company, the former company store remains as a later remnant of the once bustling Wauregan Mill community. Built in 1875, this Italianate building was constructed as a store and public meeting space for the workers of the mill, many of whom were parts of larger families from Europe. The company store enabled workers to buy fresh food and milk that were produced in the company farm north of the village. On the top floor, a large ballroom allowed for larger events and religious meetings before the local church was built. The building was later occupied by the Connecticut Mop Manufacturing Company.