Academy of the Holy Family // 1914

Built adjacent to and just a few years after the St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception Church in Baltic (last post), the Academy of the Holy Family stands as a high-style Colonial Revival building in the town. The building stands four full floors with a raised basement and attic story, and is symmetrical in its design. A large fan-light transom and stone trimmings add much depth to the buildings large massing. The structure was built in 1914, and has housed the Academy of the Holy Family, a private, Roman-Catholic all-girls prep school, which is still active today.

St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception Church // 1911

One of the grandest and high-style buildings in Sprague’s Baltic Village is the St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception Church. As Irish, French- Canadians and Poles settled in the village of Baltic, they formed a substantial Catholic community. This congregation was founded by 1860 and a modest church building was erected at that time. As the town’s Catholic population grew, the Archdiocese decided to fund a new church building. This Romanesque Revival style building was constructed in 1911 and it must have made a big statement when it was completed. The building is one of the most unique church designs that I have seen in Connecticut.

Cote Block // c.1910

The population of Sprague, Connecticut nearly doubled between 1900 and 1910 from 1,300 to 2,500. As a result, the town needed a new town hall and commercial buildings to service the new residents. A member of the Cote Family in Sprague took this as a good opportunity to erect this three-story mixed-use building on Main Street, renting out space for retail, a confectioner, and a clubhouse with residences above. The building is constructed of concrete block, a building material that surged in popularity after concrete block machines allowed these blocks to be manufactured quickly off molds of uniform style and dimension. The building also features inset center and corner porches off the street and a projecting cornice. The storefronts have since been enclosed, but the building remains one of the finest in town (even with its original windows!)