Seventh-Day Adventist Church // 1842

In the township of Washington, New Hampshire, about three miles from the Washington Town Green, stands a rural church building, a white wooden structure complimenting freshly fallen snow. This church is honored as the mother church of the first Seventh-Day Adventists. Its story started in 1842 by a local group of farmers calling themselves Christian Brethren, who dissented sharply from the strict Congregationalism of the Church in Washington Center. Many of the Christian Brethren became Adventists about the time this building was first used, and thereafter some of them began worshiping on the Seventh Day; and eventually the majority did so. In 1862 the official Seventh-day Adventist denomination was born at this place. Today, the building is a regular point of pilgrimage for members of the massive, international congregation.

Frederick W. Lewis Mansion // 1876

The Frederick W. Lewis Mansion in Newport, New Hampshire is a unique, late-Second Empire home constructed of brick. The home was built in 1876 for Frederick W. Lewis, a merchant who climbed the ranks as a young man, eventually purchasing the store he worked at as a 14-year-old. In 1862, he became cashier of the Sugar River Bank, and held the position until 1865, when the bank was re-organized as a national bank, taking the name of “The First National Bank of Newport.” He then leveraged his position to get into local politics, and took an active role in the development of the town, even incentivizing the railroad to build a stop in town. From this wealth and position, he built this large home. After his death, the home went to his son. By the 1940s, a group of over 30 residents of town purchased the home as a Veteran’s Home. By the end of the 20th century, the home was occupied by the Newport Earth Institute, a school created by esoteric historian and researcher Reverend Vincent Bridges, who died in 2014. The property appears to be vacant now and the home is in much need of some TLC.

Whitney Hall // 1901

The Enfield, New Hampshire Library and Memorial Building, also known as Whitney Hall, is a transitional Queen Anne/Shingle Style building built in 1900-1901. Local citizens donated funds for construction of the building to house the public library, as well as a selectmen’s office and rooms for fraternal organizations (notably the Grand Army of the Republic). The second floor, known as Whitney Hall, served as a public hall and theater. Mill operator George Whitney donated $1,000 for its construction and also built the village’s first electric plant, making Enfield one of the first towns in the state to have electricity for its homes and streetlights. During World War II, the top of the tower was enclosed to spot for enemy aircraft, remaining enclosed to this day. In 1976 the building underwent major renovation and now also contains the Enfield town offices.