Bennett House // 1913

Seemingly constructed in the early 19th century as a Federal style home, this house in Brookline was actually constructed 100 years later in 1913 as a Federal Revival mansion for real estate developer and mortgage broker Henry Bennett. The home was originally located on Walnut Street, opposite the First Parish Church (featured in the last post), but was moved away from the street in 1935, to front a smaller street, Hedge Street, developed by Martin P. Kennard. The stunning home was designed by the architectural firm of Kilham and Hopkins, both of whom attended MIT and designed many stunning properties all around the region in the early 20th century, many in Revival styles.

Swan-Davenport House // 1897

Located next to the Jeremiah Hill House on Kennard Street in Brookline, this home appears to have taken its architectural cues from its older neighbor. The home was built in 1897 for Francis and Sarah Swan, in the Neo-Classical style, which employed design from Classical Roman and Greek architecture and saw its resurgence in the late 19th-early 20th centuries as a revival from the Greek Revival period in the early-mid 19th century. Mr. Swan, the first owner of this home was vice-president of the Brookline National Bank (later
the Brookline Trust). He sold the home just three years after it was completed, to Francis H. Davenport, a physician. The home was designed by architect Frank Manton Wakefield, who previously trained in the offices of Henry Hobson Richardson and lived nearby in town.

Pastan Houses // 1936 & 1963

Located across the street from each other in Brookline, the Pastan Houses are an excellent example of how architectural tastes can change from one generation to another. The William Pastan House was constructed in 1936, and is Tudor Revival in style. The home has a projecting square entry tower with castellated roofline and interesting mixture of materials and textures. The first owner, William Pastan raised his family in the home, attending the synagogue a couple blocks away. By 1963, Pastan’s son, Harvey became a successful engineer and built a home near his parents for his own family, though in a very different aesthetic. The Modern home features boxy forms, prominent covered parking spaces, and expanses of glass.

Which house would you prefer, William’s (1936) or Harvey’s (1963)?

Glacy House // 1930

Residential architecture of the early decades of the 20th century is among my favorites as the Tudor Revival movement took off and was sometimes mixed with other revival styles at the time, creating really unique homes. The Glacy House in South Brookline, MA was built in 1930 as one of the earlier homes in the Walnut Hill development. It was likely designed and built by Walter L. Fernandez, a contractor who appears to have design-built a handful of spec homes to help get the neighborhood’s development going in the early stages. This home was originally occupied by George and Mary Glacy. George later worked as Vice President of the Boston & Maine Railroad, though he later got into legal trouble for hiring companies for railroad projects where he had financial interests, becoming indicted in an antitrust case by a Federal grand jury. The home features a first floor constructed of stone and brick with half-timbering on the floor above. The building is topped by a terracotta red tile roof, which is fairly uncommon for the region.

Bapst Library – Boston College // 1922

Completed in 1928, the Boston College Library is believed to have been designed after the Merton Tower in Oxford, England, and I definitely see the resemblance. The buildings was the third constructed on the Boston College Chestnut Hill Campus, all three by Charles Maginnis, and features some hidden architectural gems from little carvings of authors and academics on the exterior to the jaw-dropping reading room.