James H. Gardner House // 1923

My favorite part about the Boston suburbs is the sheer number of well-preserved early 20th century residences. The collection of Colonial Revival, Tudor, and Arts and Crafts style houses found in Waban Village, Newton, are among my favorites. This two-story stucco-clad house enclosed by a slate gable roof with exposed rafter ends was built in 1923 from designs by architect Harry Morton Ramsay. Ramsay was hired to design dozens of middle-upper class houses in Newton during its period of rapid development in the early 20th century. The original owner was James H. Gardner, who lived here with his family and a maid for a couple decades.

Webber House // 1935

Located in South Brookline, a neighborhood of mostly early-mid 20th century architecture, you can find amazing residential designs for middle-class suburban families in the Boston area. This home was built in 1935 for Max and Rebeccah Webber in the Garrison Colonial Revival style. The home, designed by architect Harry Morton Ramsay, is characterized by a second-story shingled overhang with decorative pendants reminiscent of 17th century American homes. Adding some extra flair, an eyebrow dormer can be found at the roof, as well as a glazed projecting entry porch with a broad pediment and corner pilasters.

Williams House // 1935

The Williams House on Carlton Street in the Cottage Farm neighborhood of Brookline was built in 1935 and is a great example of a Tudor Revival residential design. The home was designed by architect Harry Morton Ramsay, who completed over 75 residential commissions in the town of Brookline alone. He specialized in Tudor and Colonial Revival designs prior to WWII and after, he practiced in Ranch and split-level homes. This property is a late Tudor Revival constructed of red brick with stone detailing. The small oriel above the front door, decorative bargeboards at the gable and metal casement windows add much texture to the building.