Charles Dexter House // c.1910

Craftsman bungalows are a rarity in New England. The Craftsman style surged in the early 1900s, which coincided with the ever-popular Colonial Revival styles reign as most commonly built house style. Many of the Craftsmans that were built are less “ornate” than the West Coast counterparts, lacking deep exposed rafters, sweeping porches, and low-pitched roofs, but they are out there. This bungalow in Rochester was built around 1910 and has some Colonial qualities, including the Tuscan columns, boxed eaves, and shingle siding. I do love that full-length porch and hipped roof with a cute centered dormer! Do you wish we had more Craftsmans in New England?

161 Cedar St, Braintree // 1910

This gorgeous house in Braintree is an amazing blending of both the Shingle style and Craftsman in a modest home. Built in about 1910, the home has a prominent full-width porch with shingled supports embraced under the flared eaves. The steeply pitched roof is punctuated by three gabled dormers with flared eaves and exposed rafters. Typical of the Shingle Style, ornamentation is limited, focusing attention on the shingled texture of the roof and wall surface. Even the foundation is not visible, for shingles extend to the ground. The form and minimal detailing evoke the Craftsman style with the full-length front porch, exposed rafter tails and pitched roof in this design. A ca.1980s one-story addition was added to the side. I couldn’t find anything on the original owners, but the home was too great not to share!