Rochester Grange Hall // 1924

The Grange, officially named The National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, is a social organization that encourages families to band together to promote the economic and political well-being of the community and agriculture. Grange Halls can be found in rural towns and villages all over New England, and historically served as a gathering place to discuss agriculture-based business, crops, trade, and issues faced in the community. The Rochester Grange Hall was constructed in 1924 to the designs of architects Brown and Poole of New Bedford, MA and is of the Craftsman style. The National Grange has sharply declined in membership since the late 19th century. In 2013, the Grange signed on to a letter to Congress calling for the doubling of legal immigration and legalization for undocumented immigrants currently in the United States. The Grange now emphasizes an expansion in the H-2A visa program to increase legal immigration and address the crisis-level labor shortage in agriculture.

Sippican Tennis Club // 1908

The Sippican Tennis Club in Marion, Massachusetts, was established in 1908 for the purpose of athletic exercise and a place for social gatherings in town. Historically, the town’s population surged in the summer months when wealthy city residents would flock here and stay in their waterfront mansions for a few months a year. The large hipped roof rectangular building was constructed just before the club opened in 1908, and it is flanked by eight tennis courts. Charles Allerton Coolidge, a principal in the well known firm, Shepley Rutan and Coolidge, was one of the original shareholders as well as the architect for the building. He also was a summer resident himself (his home was previously featured). The building is constructed of concrete and features paired, tapered columns which run the perimeter of the structure, supporting a deep porch. The broad elliptical arch and exposed rafters add to the Craftsman style flair of the building.

St. Rita’s Roman Catholic Church // 1916

A Roman Catholic parish was established in the South Coast/Cape Cod area by 1830 in Sandwich, where a large glass company employed a number of Irish immigrants. Over the course of the 19th century, several mission churches were established, and eventually a second parish, St. Patrick’s, was established in Wareham in 1911. Soon after, a mission was established in nearby Marion to serve the summertime Catholic community there. A parcel of land was acquired by the Roman Catholic Bishop of Fall River and they hired architect Matthew Sullivan to furnish plans for the small church. Matthew Sullivan (1868–1948) trained in the office of Edmund M. Wheelwright, Boston City Architect (1891-1894). Sullivan succeeded Wheelwright as City Architect and served in that position from 1895 to 1901, when he became a junior partner in the firm of Maginnis, Walsh and Sullivan, which was widely known for its ecclesiastical work, where he too specialized in religious buildings. St. Rita’s Roman Catholic Church is an example of an early 20th century chapel in the Craftsman style, characterized by eaves marked by long projecting rafter tails and a bold entry framed by Tuscan columns.

Brookfield Theatre // 1907

The Curtis School for Boys was founded in 1875 in Bethlehem, Connecticut by Frederick S. Curtis as a private school for young men aged 9-13. Curtis moved the school to Brookfield Center in 1883 and began constructing a campus. Buildings for the 30 pupils and five instructors included a dormitory, President’s residence, schoolhouse, caretaker’s cottage, and gymnasium on 50 acres. The school never expanded beyond a few dozen students, likely under Frederick Curtis’ supervision. The school closed in 1943, at the onset of America’s involvement in WWII, and it never re-opened. The campus sat in the village center for over a decade, with many of the buildings falling to the wrecking ball for safety reasons. Possibly the only building remaining is the 1907 gymnasium, constructed of rubblestone. The building was purchased by the Brookfield Country Players in 1959 and remodeled as a community theater. The theater group was founded two years prior, and it required its own theater space after a school complained about an actor appearing on stage without a shirt, the horror! The group remains a regional institution in the arts and is a great caretaker of their historic Arts and Crafts style building.

Asbury Grove Bates Library // 1910

Located near the Asbury Grove Chapel in Hamilton, MA, this Craftsman style library building shows how the camp evolved into the 20th century. The library was constructed in 1910 with a rectangular floor plan and is enclosed by a hip roof with deep eaves lined by exposed roof rafters, consistent with its Craftsman-style design. The L.B. Bates Memorial Library was named after the first chaplain for Asbury Grove, who contributed a large number of books to start a library. By the late 19th century, camp meetings were declining in popularity across the United States. This change had as much to do with society’s movement away from the religious fervency of the 18th and 19th centuries as with the ease of travel caused by extensive railroad construction and the introduction of the automobile

James Stedman House // 1907

This early 20th century home in Braintree was built by 1907 for James H. Stedman (1877-1950), a businessman who started the Stedman Rubber Company out of Boston and Braintree MA. The company made many rubber-based products but advertised mostly rubber floor panels which were installed all over the nation. He had this Craftsman/Colonial Revival home built when he was just thirty years old and becoming more established financially. The home features prominent stone construction on the first floor with shingles on the second floor, joined by a thin row of scalloped shingles. In addition to the variety of wall materials mentioned above, the roof, with its wide overhang, exposed rafters, and steep pitch, becomes part of the decorative scheme.

161 Cedar St, Braintree // 1910

This gorgeous house in Braintree is an amazing blending of both the Shingle style and Craftsman in a modest home. Built in about 1910, the home has a prominent full-width porch with shingled supports embraced under the flared eaves. The steeply pitched roof is punctuated by three gabled dormers with flared eaves and exposed rafters. Typical of the Shingle Style, ornamentation is limited, focusing attention on the shingled texture of the roof and wall surface. Even the foundation is not visible, for shingles extend to the ground. The form and minimal detailing evoke the Craftsman style with the full-length front porch, exposed rafter tails and pitched roof in this design. A ca.1980s one-story addition was added to the side. I couldn’t find anything on the original owners, but the home was too great not to share!