Dutch House // 1893

Located on the appropriately named Netherlands Road in Brookline, MA, this house was actually designed as a temporary structure as part of the 1893 World’s Fair, also known as the World’s Columbian Exposition or the White City, depicted in the great book, Devil in the White City. The Dutch House was constructed in 1893 by the Van Houten Cocoa Company of the Netherlands, as a display pavilion and cocoa house. It was located at one end of the Manufactures and Liberal Arts Building (the largest building ever constructed at the time). The Dutch House as we know of it today, was greatly inspired in design by the Franeker City Hall (c. 1591) in the Netherlands. While attending the World’s Fair, Captain Charles Brooks Appleton of Brookline be.came so captivated with the structure that after the Fair, he purchased the building and had it dismantled and transported to Brookline. By the early 2000s, much of the amazing carvings on the building had fallen off, until a new homeowner had them all restored from drawings and images of the building, to the iconic landmark we see today.

Brookline Fire Station #7 // 1898

If you’ve been to Brookline, you’ve probably heard of or seen the Dutch House, but have you seen the Dutch (Fire) House? This amazing fire station on Washington Street in Brookline was built in 1898 for the growing town’s suburban population. Local architect G. Fred Crosby designed the building in a Dutch Renaissance Revival style, likely influenced by the Dutch House which was moved to Brookline just years before. The brick building has a Dutch stepped gable roof, stone detailing around the openings, and a tall Italian Renaissance style hose tower to the rear. The station was minimally altered at the exterior, most notably in 1951 for the enlarging of a bay to allow for larger fire apparatus to get in and out of the building. The building was featured in BrickBuilder, an architectural journal which focused on buildings and designs for brick.