Goldfarb Tenements // 1910

Constructed in 1910 to house ten apartments, this tenement building is architecturally significant and high-style to blend in with the many Federal and Greek Revival homes in Boston’s Beacon Hill neighborhood. The building replaced an earlier home and was built for Lillian Goldfarb as an investment opportunity. The tenement block was designed by Max M. Kalman, a Russian-born, Boston-based architect who designed most of the post-1900 tenements on the North Slope. Kalman designed many tenements and other buildings in Beacon Hill and the West End for Jewish property-owners. The Goldfarb Tenement building is a richly detailed example of a tenement whose red brick, brownstone and cast stone-trimmed facades are dominated by substantial cast metal oriel windows. The cast metal is a cheaper material than traditional copper which would patina that same color.

Bachelor Apartments // 1890

Located at the corner of Beacon and Charles Streets in Boston’s Beacon Hill neighborhood, the Bachelor Apartments showcase the luxurious housing available to single Bostonians and young couples. The seven-story apartment house was designed by Charles Follen McKim in the Renaissance Revival style and is one of a limited number of McKim, Mead & White buildings in Boston. The building was likely geared towards young bachelors (due to its name) who were not yet established in their professions. The building featured commercial space on the ground floor, which originally housed a grocer. By the 1940s, the residents of the 13 apartments were mostly represented as widows with a few single bachelors there. The stunning building stands today as a prominent southern anchor of the Beacon Hill neighborhood and an entry to the Charles Street commercial district.